Nature

Dogs Know What Their Owners' Faces Look Like: Recognition Explains Your Pup's Constant Eye Contact
Dec 18, 2013 17:27 PM E
It's well known that a dog will notice its owner before strangers, but is it because of their smell, or because they recognize their owner's face? According to a new study, dogs do indeed recognize their owners' faces, even when the face is just an image on a screen.
chimp
Chimpanzees Learn Food Preparation From One Another, Study Suggests
Dec 18, 2013 15:24 PM E
Chimpanzees learn from one another how to open fruit, a new study suggests. Bruce Rawlings and Marina Davila-Ross from the University of Portsmouth, in England, looked at three different chimp groups and found that different methods of opening the fruit emerged in each group, indicating that the members of each group were learning from one another.
Facepalm
The 9 Most Pointless Scientific Studies of 2013, Plus Some That Were Just Plain Wrong
Dec 18, 2013 14:44 PM E
From a study that proved that students were bored in class, to one that showed that coffee-drinking was associated with a lower suicide rate, research ran the gamut of idiocy this past year.
Are Reindeer And Caribou The Same Thing? New Study Says They Are Lost Cousins, Driven In Different Directions By The Ice Age
Dec 17, 2013 19:00 PM E
A recent genetic mapping published in Nature Climate Change of the Rangifer tarandus (AKA caribou and reindeer) shows the migration pattern of these mammals in North America over the last 21,000 years, and claims that they are actually different animals — but closely related cousins.
diamonds
Diamonds In Antarctica: Researchers Discover Kimberlite Deposits, Which May Contain Precious Stones
Dec 17, 2013 17:57 PM E
Researchers have found kimberlite in Antarctica, a rare rock that may contain diamonds. Greg Yaxley of the Australian National University in Canberra, who led the research on the kimberlite, said that it would be "very surprising" if the kimberlite didn't contain diamonds. While mining in Antarctica is illegal due to a 1991 protocol ...
Neanderthal
Neanderthals Buried Their Dead In Caves, Researchers Find
Dec 17, 2013 14:50 PM E
Neanderthals buried their dead, a new study finds. Studying remains found at La Chapelle-aux-Saints cave in southwestern France, study author William Rendu found bones buried in pits that were not naturally formed. The study, "Evidence supporting an intentional Neanderthal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints," was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Cat Domestication Traced To Ancient Chinese Farm: Felines Became Friends 5,300 Years Ago
Dec 16, 2013 15:08 PM E
Early signs of cat domestication found in 5,300-year-old ancient farm village based in Shaanxi Province, Northwest China.
Electronic Waste
Solving The Electronic Waste Problem: Report Predicts 33% Growth In E-Waste By 2017, With China and US Leading The Way
Dec 16, 2013 12:47 PM E
According to a new report published by the UN-backed organization StEP (Solving the E-Waste Problem (StEP) Initiative"), by 2017 there will be a 33 percent global jump in e-waste.
North Pole Drifting Due Climate Change
True North? Poles Become A Moving Target As They Shift From Climate Change
Dec 15, 2013 20:18 PM E
The North Pole is shifting due to melting glaciers and ice sheets — a result of climate change. The finding suggests that scientists might be able to track global warming by monitoring the position of the poles.
4.4 Million Year Old Ethiopian Horse Species Fills In The Gap In Equestrian Evolution
Dec 13, 2013 17:00 PM E
A 4.4 million year old fossilized animal found in the Afar region in Ethiopia was determined to be a horse the size of a small zebra. The horse species is named Eurygnathohippus woldegabrieli.
Andes Frog Population Declining Due To Deadly Fungus, Not Climate Change
Dec 13, 2013 16:01 PM E
A new study published in the journal Conservation Biology conclusively identifies the cause of a waning frog population in the Andes mountains: a deadly fungus that thrives in the temperature zone of the mountain range.
comb jelly
The Comb Jelly Was Our First Ancestor, Surprising Evolution Study Says
Dec 12, 2013 17:07 PM E
The first animal was the comb jelly, according to a new study that displaces the sponge at the base of animal evolution. Sponges have long been thought to be the first animals. Comb jellies are more evolved than sponges, making it counterintuitive that they would have evolved from sponges--and calling into question much of what we know about evolution.
Rooster Dinosaur
Mummified Duck-Billed Dinosaur Reveals Species Had A 'Rooster Comb,' Offering New Clues About Behavior
Dec 12, 2013 17:06 PM E
A duck-billed dinosaur, once the most common giant lizard in North America, had a flabby piece of ornamental flesh on the top of its head, scientists have learned. "This is equivalent to discovering for the first time that elephants had trunks," researcher says.
Giant Oarfish
2013's Craziest Creatures On Earth: A Year In Weird Animal Stories, From TV-Eating Ants To Exploding Whales
Dec 11, 2013 16:32 PM E
In a year filled with strange animal stories, here are the craziest creatures of 2013. Dumpster-stealing bears, jellyfish-shredding robots and of course crazy ants are just a few of the things that made the list this year.
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Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
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Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
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How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
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Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
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This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)